Fünf Fragen an ...

Fachschaft und Studiengangleitung haben sich gemeinsam fünf Fragen an Dozierende des Studiengangs überlegt, die Studierenden die Gelegenheit geben sollen die Dozent*innen ein wenig besser kennenzulernen. Hier sind nun die Antworten zu finden - vielen Dank an alle, die teilgenommen haben!

How did you decide on your field of study?

Since I have more than one I focus on film studies. I have been a movie-goer since I was a growing up and always wanted to learn about cinematography, but when I started to study there was no film institute or seminar. So I had to wait until I got a Ph.D. to see such an institute established – and I had the great luck to be invited for collaboration. So I started writing about film and still find this as exciting as pleasurable.

What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

Hard to tell. So my general answer is: I feel comfortable when the students do not only pick up the issue but add further information and start researching on their own. The best feedback one can get is to arouse interest and ambition.

What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

Michail M. Bakhtin, The word in the novel; Umberto Eco, Opera aperta; Wolfgang Iser, Der Akt des Lesens; Nelson Goodman, Ways of worldmaking, Sorry, but there are so many more I could name, at least: Spivak, Can the subaltern speak?

Is the glass half full or half empty?

Depends on the beholder and I would always tend to affirm that it is half full.

Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

Do never accept an advice that do contradict your ambitions and convictions.

1. How did you decide on your field of study?

I've always loved reading - I have to confess that I was one of those nerdy kids always walking around with a novel or poetry collection in high school. I started studying English with a focus on British literature, and when I spent an undergraduate year in Ireland, I found myself noticing that I was much more interested in my roommate's reading (who was enrolled in American Studies) than my own. Coincidentally, when I returned to Germany, I had an offer to come on board as a student assistant in the American Studies department, so that's how I became an Americanist. My research focus in Indigenous Studies came from a seminar during my graduate semester in the U.S. - an amazing course on Native American literature, taught by the wonderful Lucy Maddox and featuring some 15 novels. I was hooked immediately, and have been ever since.

2. What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

I would have to let my students decide that - it also depends on the criteria you set for "best". My seminars on "Disney and Imperialism" and "First Contact Narratives from Columbus to Star Trek" have been pretty popular with students, but I definitely enjoy every topic we explore together. I also greatly enjoy the liberty of deciding on my topics, so if anyone has particularly "desirable" topics that match with my area of expertise, don't hesitate to let me know. :) In general, I believe in research-oriented teaching, so I also like combining seminars with academic conferences.

3. What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

How much space do I have - top 100? But seriously... For novels, I would probably go with Henry James's Turn of the Screw, William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom, and Toni Morrison's Beloved. And anything by Louise Erdrich, Jesmyn Ward, and Thomas King. For poetry: Hilde Domin, Robert Frost, Anne Sexton, Simon Ortiz. For plays: Tony Kushner's Angels in America, Tomson Highway's Rez Sisters, and anything by Shakespeare). Non-fiction: Roland Barthes' Mythologies, Hayden White's Metahistory, and The Cambridge Companion to Limiting Your Choice of Books.

4. Is the glass half full or half empty?

Half full, always. But my most frequent quotidian answer goes more like this:

Optimist: "half full!"

Pessimist: "half empty!"

Me (as a mom): "why is there no coaster underneath?!"

5. Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

Follow your interests and your heart. Go abroad. (I actually did, several times - among the top 5 best decisions of my life!). Dare to ask questions. Do not let yourself be intimidated by others. And, as Mary Schmich once put it: Wear sunscreen.

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

So, wie ich mir das gar nicht anders vorstellen kann: Durch Interesse. Aber das herauszufinden, war gar nicht so einfach. Als Teenager war ich mal mit der Schule bei einer dieser Pflicht-Veranstaltungen des Arbeitsamtes. Dort machte ich einen Was-passt-zu-mir-Test und heraus kam: Kaufmann für Spedition und Logistikdienstleistung. Das war damals schon nicht das erste, was mir einfallen würde und als dann ein Mitarbeiter um die Ecke kam und sagte: ‚Was ein Zufall, solche Leute werden dringend gesucht!‘, habe ich mich lieber selbst auf die Suche begeben. Was ich damit sagen möchte: Es war ein langer Weg. Logistisch gar nicht so einfach.

Welches war ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Für das Seminar "Literatur und Gedächtnis" bekam ich sehr positive Rückmeldungen von den Studierenden. Das Interesse an den Themen Erinnerungskultur und ‚Vergangenheitsbewältigung‘ ist hoch und diese Seminare werden gerne angenommen. Ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft wäre "Lyrik und Gesellschaft", das plane ich jetzt schon das vierte Semester, aber irgendwie kommt immer was dazwischen. Nächstes Semester bestimmt. Oder übernächstes, mal schauen.

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Diese Frage wurde mir in anderen Kontexten schon einige Male gestellt und ich versuche immer mich um sie herumzumogeln, weil es mir fahrlässig erscheint, nur ‚dieses eine Buch‘ anzugeben. Das ist ja bei einer Top-10-Liste schon nicht möglich, geschweige denn bei einer Top-100-Liste. So geht das also nicht. Manchmal mogele ich mich um die Frage herum und benenne einen Lieblingsschriftsteller/eine Lieblingsschriftstellerin (was das eigentliche Problem nicht beseitigt, sondern nur verlagert, ich weiß), aber seit Bob Dylan den Nobelpreis für Literatur bekommen hat, ist dieses Feld auch etwas fluide geworden. Das gefällt mir, nämlich dann kann ich meine Lieblingskünstlerin nennen, deren Texte und deren Lieder mich seit Jahrzehnten faszinieren. Und das ist: Patti Smith.

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Das hängt schwer vom Inhalt des Glases ab.

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Das ist so eine Sache: Damals bin ich immer brav zur Studienberatung gegangen und habe mir auch neugierig angehört, was andere, die im Studium etwas weiter waren als ich, geraten haben. Das hört sich für mich heute noch plausibel an. Würde ich aber meinem Studierenden-Ich heute begegnen und einen Rat geben, unter den Bedingungen heute, würde mir folgendes einfallen: Bei allen Zwängen und Nöten, den ganzen Prüfungsanforderungen und unterschiedlichen Modulkatalogen, in denen Du festklemmst, während Du noch unbedingt diesen einen Passierschein A38 bekommen musst, vergiss nicht, dass diese Dinge kein Selbstzweck sind. Schaffe Dir Freiräume, vor allem emotionale und zeitliche, in denen Du das tun kannst, was wirklich wichtig ist im Leben: Ein gutes Buch lesen und mit jemandem über Literatur reden. Denn dafür ist das Studium ja eigentlich da. Wenn das nicht mehr möglich ist vor lauter Modul- und Prüfungszwängen, dann läuft etwas falsch und daran musst Du etwas ändern.

How did you decide on your field of study?

I really had no choice. My family in which I grew up is multilingual in a non-academic way (meaning that nobody speaks any language or variety properly and never without mixing and switching languages constantly). I didn’t see it coming but when I started writing up my PhD on Danish as spoken in the Danish minority in South Schleswig (which is influenced a lot by German), friends and family weren’t surprised.

What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

My first (and best!) KSM-seminar topic has been last semester’s course on ‘Language and migration’. It’s a topic that caught my interest during a research project on Danish emigrants and their descendants in Argentina and North America and I’ve been working on it ever since. The KSM-students brought a lot of interesting migration stories back to class by interviewing people with a migration history (once they overcame their shyness and learnt how to do an interview) which they then analysed by using the theoretical approaches we had studied together.

What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

That’s hard to say. I read a lot and rather randomly, and it seems that different books affect you differently at different points in life. Non-fiction: Skautrup (Danish language history) for his immense knowledge and precision, or the weekly The Economist. Fiction: The books by Marilynne Robinson, in particular ‘Lila’.

Is the glass half full or half empty?

Always almost empty, always thirsty for more. For others? Always half full.

Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

Do not be scared of asking questions. Your university teachers would have loved to get some more questions, they would have enjoyed the interest, not considered you stupid and non-academic.

How did you decide on your field of study?

I wanted to live in England for a bit, decided that studying there might be a good idea and applied for places at universities. I received four rejections and one offer and thus embarked on a B.A. in English and German Linguistics at the University of Newcastle on Tyne. I knew very little about the topic which was a stroke of luck. Everything was new and I decided to find everything exciting. This helped with settling into a new environment, culture and country. A short 25 years later I moved back to Germany.

What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

The History of Linguistic Purism (= Richtiges und Gutes Deutsch von Schottelius bis Sick)

What books have particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

The name of the rose. Die drei ??? und der magische Kreis. Robert Burchfield´s The English Language.

Is the glass half full or half empty?

I prefer mugs and cups.

Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

Embrace everything. Feel privileged to be able to structure your day and study what you´re interested in. Go to research colloquia and public lectures. Find out about the city and region you live in: you will have to tell your grandchildren about this, so make sure you have some interesting stories ready. Learn Frisian!

How did you decide on your field of study?

I have a couple of research fields and research interests, but as most of you will know me from what I mentally label as a "business studies as cultural studies" class, I’m going to talk about that field a little. It’s actually not a terribly exciting story – I have a "Magister Artium" degree from the University of Mannheim, which is one of the big business studies universities in Germany, and for this degree I had to pick different subjects that I wanted to study.

The "Magister Artium" in Mannheim allowed for almost any combination of subjects that one wanted to pick, and so while I also followed my interests into picking "Anglistik & Amerikanistik," I knew from the start that I did not want to become a school teacher, and so I added "Betriebswirtschaftslehre (BWL)" as my second subject ("media studies" was my third and "public law" my overachiever bonus subject – yes I was keeping my options wide open and also planning on a career in a major corporation somewhere).

The thing about studying a) your own choice of and b) such diverse subjects is that there wasn’t any real interaction / intersection / connection between the disciplines – or rather, you were the connection between the disciplines, were the person who had read texts in both fields, could bring thoughts and ideas from one to the other … .

I found this lack of reciprocal enrichment and the narrow focus in my business studies classes super frustrating – and so I simply started looking for the broader picture and the connections between the disciplines myself. One of the early texts I read that was very approachable and also really showed me that such connections were viable and that people were creating/thinking/writing about them (only not in my classes) was Robert Heilbroner’s The Worldly Philosophers, which I would still highly recommend as an excellent starting point, despite it being a couple of decades old by now.

What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

This is tough one, because I genuinely really enjoy all the classes and projects I get to offer in KSM. I’m excited to be teaching the "Introduction to Intercultural Literary Studies" again in 2022, because I have plans for texts that I want to cover with students there.

What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

Narrowing this down to just one book is of course impossible and 'must' is too apodictic a term, but ...
non-fiction: Gunnar Olsson, Abysmal: A Critique of Cartographic Reason;
fiction: Lois McMaster Bujold, Cordelia's Honor.

Is the glass half full or half empty?

It’s always completely full – sometimes there’s just more air in there than at other times.

Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

I know that the Prüfungsordnung says that the written exam in "Technik des Betriebswirtschaftlichen Rechnungswesen" can be taken as many time as one likes and that the only requirement is that the class must have been passed by the end of your studies, but, trust me, first taking the intensive block seminar course for four weeks during summer break and then deciding that you won’t study for the exam: not the best choice. Taking the class all over again in the fall term will not make it any more enjoyable and really just means that you wasted those four weeks of summer.

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Mode, Jugendkultur und Yupitum waren in meiner Biografie sehr wichtige Themen. Gleichzeitig prägte mich die Weisheit "Erst wenn der letzte Baum gefällt ist, wird man feststellen, dass man Geld nicht essen kann". Kontroverser konnten die Strömungen kaum sein und lösten meine Krise zwischen Konsum, Ökonomie und Ökologie im Themenfeld Mode aus. Während meines Lehramtsstudiums besuchte ich im Rahmen einer Pflichtexkursion einen Textilrecyclingbetrieb, der mein Interesse für dieses Thema so sehr weckte, dass ich aus eigener Initiative weitere besuchte, um das Feld besser kennen zu lernen und zu hinterfragen. Ich forschte, promovierte und spezialisierte mich seither auf Nachhaltigkeit im Textilen.

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Die besten Seminare waren jene, in denen wir die fachwissenschaftliche Theorie mit realen und praktischen Erfahrungen verbinden konnten, z.B. auf Exkursionen oder in Selbstversuchen. Für die Zukunft wünsche ich mir, die Relevanz einer vermeidlich banalen Alltäglichkeit zu betonen. Ich bin überzeugt davon, dass eine sozio-ökologische Transformation nur dann gelingt, wenn viele (bestenfalls alle) gewohnte alltäglich Verhaltensweisen ökologisch ausrichten. Für mein Themenfeld Mode und Textil heißt das, textile Lehre mit textiler Lebenswirklichkeit intensiver zu verbinden und zwischen textiler Alltagskultur und textilfachwissenschaftlicher Forschung stärker zu vernetzen.

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Es gibt viele Bücher und Reportagen, die ich in dem Moment beeindruckend und lesens- oder sehenswert finde. Aktuell treibt mich das Buch von Carl Tillessen: Konsum – Warum wir kaufen, was wir nicht brauchen (Verlagsgruppe HarperCollins Deutschland 2020) um. Und als Reportage empfehle ich von Andrew Morgan: The True Costs. Seit dem Erscheinen in 2016 gibt es keine bessere Reportage zu dem Thema als diese.

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Das ist mal so, mal so.

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Nicht zu früh in konventionelle Lebensmuster eintreten, sich Zeit für das Studium nehmen und Spielräume als Studentin intensiv ausleben.

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Die Arbeiten von Michel Foucault haben mich sehr geprägt. Neben seinen Klassikern fand ich vor allem seine Schriften zu den Regierungstechnologien spannend und sah dort eine Lücke, die man medienwissenschaftlich nutzen kann. Foucault nennt zwar verschiedene Medien wie etwa Statistiken, Briefe und Bücher, mit denen eine Regierungen ihre Bevölkerung steuern kann bzw. mit denen Personen zu Selbsttechniken angeleitet werden. Er untersucht diese Medien allerdings nicht systematisch und moderne, elektrische oder digitale Medien kommen praktisch aufgrund seines Untersuchungszeitraums nicht vor. Das hat mich nicht losgelassen: Wie regulieren Medien Verhalten, Politik und Kommunikation? Wie schreiben sie sich in diese Prozesse selbst mit ein? Wie stören Medien? Wie eskalieren oder deeskalieren sie eine bestimmte Lage? Hinzu kommt noch ein Möglichkeitsdenken von Gilles Deleuze: Welche virtuellen Welten existieren noch jenseits der aktualisierten Welt? Und wie beeinflussen virtuelle Welten unser Leben im Hier und Jetzt? Nimmt man beides zusammen, interessiere ich mich dafür, wie Medien Politiken entwerfen und anleiten und dabei stets mit virtuellen Welten der Künste im Wechselverhältnis stehen.

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Bislang habe ich nur ein Seminar in KSM angeboten: Eine Einführung in die Kulturtechnikforschung. Das hat mir großen Spaß gemacht und ich möchte das unbedingt einmal wiederholen. Meine neuen Wunschthemen finden im Frühjahressemester statt: Ein Seminar zu den "Medien der Vermittlung" und eines zur "Abschreckung".

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Das eine Buch lässt sich schwer identifizieren. Spontan erinnere ich mich an eine fast rauschhafte Lektüre von Foucaults "In Verteidigung der Gesellschaft". Der Band ist eine Herausgabe einer seiner Vorlesungen am Collège de France, die insbesondere dadurch bekannt geworden ist, dass Foucault dort Clausewitz‘ berühmte These – der Krieg sei die Fortsetzung der Politik mit anderen Mitteln – umkehrt. Die Vorlesungen haben meinen Blick auf Macht und Krieg geschärft und entwerfen eine Genese des modernen Staates samt Bio-Politik und Rassismus. Sehr spannend.

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Halb voll. Mindestens.

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Studiere ein Jahr im Ausland, auch wenn dieses Ziel aufgrund bestimmter Rahmenbedingungen (Finanzen, etc.) manchmal nur schwer zu erreichen ist.

How did you decide on your field of study?

I am a literary scholar, who specializes in areas such as British Romanticism, literary space, and depictions of work in contemporary British and Irish literature and culture. Which may sound like the pursuits of a bookworm who retires to a library most of the time. And of course I am a bit of a bookworm. Comes with the territory. But looking back, my choices of fields that interested me have always developed very much in a social process. Essentially, from a variety of subjects that I could have studied, and then from a variety of topics that I could have ended up researching for my PhD and afterwards, I guess I always chose the ones which I found that I could talk about with people whom I liked.

What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

 I only joined the EUF in 2019, so I have, at the time of writing (Summer 2021), taught all of three KSM seminars in literary and cultural studies, two of which had to be moved online because of the pandemic, and were thus not quite typical. I enjoyed all three seminars, but I guess I should postpone making a choice of best topic until I have taught some more. As for future seminars, I would love to do something with literary translation as a form of cultural contact at some point.

What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

How should a literary scholar answer that? All of them? If I really have to narrow it down, everything by Virginia Woolf is definitely a must read! (In light of some of the effects of the pandemic, her essay A Room of One’s Own might in fact be a good place to begin.)

Is the glass half full or half empty?

"Always look on the bright side of life!"

Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

Being confused is part of the process of figuring something out.

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Innerhalb meines Lehramtsstudiums Kunst und Französisch für Gymnasien an der Muthesius Kunsthochschule und der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel habe ich den Schwerpunkt "Medienkunst" gewählt. Hier entwickelte ich Videoinstallationen, die ich zum Beispiel im öffentlichen Raum gezeigt habe. Meine Leidenschaft hierfür wurde so groß, dass ich mich dazu entschied, auch noch ein Studium der Freien Kunst mit Schwerpunkt Medienkunst sowie ein Aufbaustudium Visuelle Kommunikation mit Schwerpunkt Film an der Hochschule für bildende Künste in Hamburg zu absolvieren. Alles drehte sich für mich um Bewegtbilder und wie man diese gestalten, experimentell erforschen, kombinieren und räumlich präsentieren kann. Nach dem Studium habe ich mich als Videokünstlerin und Filmemacherin selbstständig gemacht. Und dann bin ich immer mehrgleisig gefahren: Zum einen wurde ich Lehrerin, zum anderen habe ich Videokunst gemacht. Irgendwann wurde mir klar, dass man das auch kombinieren kann, zum Beispiel indem man untersucht, wie man das Thema "Bewegtbild" im Kunstunterricht unterrichten kann. Bis heute verfolge ich aber mehrere Wege und arbeite zum Beispiel aktuell wieder selbst als Künstlerin im Bereich Videokunst.

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Am besten fand ich das Seminar "Video killed the radio star", in dem es um Musikvideos ging. Das hat vor allem einen Grund: Es hat unglaublich gute Laune bereitet, nicht nur die Videos zu analysieren, sondern auch die Musik dabei genießen zu können. Außerdem ist das Genre Musikvideo in beständiger Entwicklung und zeichnet sich durch viele höchst innovative Gestaltungsideen und Umsetzungen aus. In das Seminar integriert war ein Gastvortrag des Musikvideoregisseurs Timo Schierhorn. Timo zeigte und erklärte den Studierenden, wie einige seiner besten Musikvideos – zum Beispiel das Video für "Denken Sie groß" von Deichkind (gemeinsam mit Till Nowak und UWE) – entstanden sind. Wir haben die Veranstaltung für alle Interessierten der EUF und der Hochschule Flensburg geöffnet und hatten 150 Teilnehmer:innen! Da zeigte sich deutlich, dass das Thema Musikvideo auch für die Studierenden von Bedeutung ist.

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Es gibt ein Buch, das mich nie richtig losgelassen hat, obwohl ich es mir manchmal gewünscht hätte, und zwar "The Lovely Bones" (2002) von Alice Sebold. Es ist aus der Perspektive einer Teenagerin geschrieben, die vergewaltigt und ermordet worden ist und anschließend aus dem Himmel beobachtet, wie es auf der Welt ohne sie weitergeht. Das war für mich zum einen kaum auszuhalten und zum anderen konnte ich nicht aufhören, dieses Buch zu lesen. Es hat mich förmlich "aufgesaugt".

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Bei mir ist es auf jeden Fall farbig. Hell- oder dunkelblaue oder auch türkisfarbene Gläser mag ich am liebsten, sie erinnern mich an das Meer oder den Himmel. Vor allem wenn das Wasser darin kalt ist.

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Mutig sein und sich zutrauen, die eigenen Ziele zu verfolgen. Und dafür all das nutzen, was die Universität einem bietet! Man studiert in erster Linie ja für sich selbst, nicht für die Eltern oder die Dozierenden der Universität. Oft kann man eigene Schwerpunkte setzen und sich dadurch spezialisieren. Und damit kommt man dem eigenen Berufswunsch Stück für Stück näher. Auch Praxiserfahrungen finde ich sehr wichtig. Zum einen dienen sie dem Abgleich, ob das, was man machen möchte, auch wirklich so ist, wie man es sich vorstellt, zum anderen können Praxiserfahrungen der Selbstreflexion dienen, indem sie einem verdeutlichen, was man schon gut kann und was noch nicht. Nicht selten ergeben sich aus Praxiserfahrungen dann auch spätere Tätigkeiten. 

1. How did you decide on your field of study?

For American Studies, in general, the fact that my mother was an English teacher probably was a significant influence. She was very much focused on British culture, however, so perhaps, my American focus was rebellious in some small way. I simply found (and still do!) that American literature includes the most interesting texts which speak to me the most. My focus on (nonfiction) comics is something that came out of my own studies at the University of Hamburg. I had a mentor who specializes in comics studies, and this sparked my own interest. I have a general fascination with attempts to represent reality through language, media, and so on, and the impossibility to ever do so in full. This impasse between private experience and interpersonal or public communication is especially interesting in graphic nonfiction.

2. What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

I haven’t taught in KSM so far, but I very much look forward to doing so! For my first one, I want to do a general survey of different documentary media. It will be cool to discuss the affordances and constraints of different media and to talk about documentary ethics and impulses more broadly.

3. What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

Although I don’t think there is that one book that everyone should have read, here we go! Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian remains a favorite of mine. For non-American works, Haruki Murakami’s Kafka on the Shore I found truly fascinating as well. Often, books that take you out of your comfort zone and/or offer different perspectives like Toni Morrison’s Beloved or Octavia Butler’s Kindred can be especially rewarding. As for comics, Art Spiegelman’s Maus and Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic were eyeopeners for me. When it comes to general nonfiction, Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow is probably closest to what I would call an essential read that helps us reflect our own thought processes. Possibly, George Lakoff’s Don’t Think of an Elephant as well. Oh, and on the lighter side, Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series has never failed to provide comic relief for me.

4. Is the glass half full or half empty?

Different perspectives on the same glass will be just as valid and I think it is important to acknowledge this. A positive outlook is a good way to stay sane, but it should not lead us to invalidate other experiences. Also, as the Kahneman and Lakoff books will tell you, whether we perceive the glass as half full or half empty will depend on a variety of factors beyond what we would like to actively believe. That’s what I find fascinating.

5. Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

From a position where everything has (kind of) worked out in the end, I would probably tell myself to be less anxious and kinder to myself. Come to think of it, that’s probably advice I should still take to heart more.

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Der Forschungsgegenstand – Film – ist zu mir nach Hause gekommen, als ich noch ein Kind war. In unserer Familie wurden viele Filme geschaut und es kam auch drauf an, was und von wem die Filme jeweils waren.  Und für zum Beispiel unverständlicherweise spätabends gesendete Charlie-Chaplin-Filme gab es das Konzept des "Vorschlafens": früh ins Bett gehen und dafür zu Sendebeginn geweckt werden. Das hat Filmen eine Dringlichkeit und einen Wert verliehen, die bis heute bestehen. Verändert und – hoffentlich – erweitert haben sich natürlich Blick und Erkenntnis(-interesse).

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Aus der bisher schmalen Auswahl würde ich mich für "Kunst im Film" entscheiden. Das habe ich schon mehr als einmal angeboten und konnte so lernen, was ich das nächste Mal besser mache. Und was ich besser nicht mache. Abgesehen davon: Es war spannend zu sehen, wohin sich das Seminar entwickelt hat, wie die Studierenden es verändern, erweitern und prägen, trotz aller geplanten Struktur.

Für die Zukunft? Wie Tanz in einem Film unmittelbar die dargestellte Welt verändern kann, finde ich schon lange faszinierend. Allerdings habe ich bisher noch gezögert, darum herum ein Seminar zu konstruieren.

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Das finde ich schwierig. Erstens sind es natürlich etliche Bücher (jeden Tag würde die 10er-Liste anders ausschauen). Und zweitens habe ich Sorge, dass ich das hier genannte Buch beim Wiederlesen auf einmal langweilig, banal oder prätentiös fände.  Aber ich versuch’s mal: In "Rabbit Redux",  dem zweiten Buch der Rabbit-Tetralogie von John Updike, findet an einer einzigen Stelle (auf fast 2000 Seiten) ein vorübergehender Perspektivwechsel statt. Dass der sich so erschütternd auswirkt, liegt vor allem daran, dass er den Protagonisten in einer Weise relativiert, von der dieser sich nicht mehr erholen wird. Das hat mich als Leser verändert. Ein paar weitere ungeordnet durch den Kopf rauschende Bücher, an die ich immer wieder denken muss: The Glass Key (Dashiell Hammett), The Blazing World (Siri Hustvedt), Limonov (Emmanuel Carrère), Aufzeichnungen aus dem Kellerloch (Dostojewski)

Aber wahrscheinlich ist vor allem ein wissenschaftliches Buch gemeint und hier fällt mir zuerst "Visual Style in Cinema – Vier Kapitel Filmgeschichte" von David Bordwell ein. Instruktiver und eleganter habe ich mich bisher selten über grundlegende Formen visueller Arrangements im Film unterrichtet gefühlt.

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Kommt drauf an, was drin ist. Bier: schade, schon halb leer – H-Milch: verdammt, noch halbvoll

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Konkrete Ratschläge habe ich nicht zur Hand, aber vielleicht ganz allgemeine: Lies die schwierigen Bücher jetzt, später sind sie auch nicht viel einfacher. Außerdem ist es meine Erfahrung, dass es sich für mich meistens gelohnt hat, einen Fuß in Bereiche zu setzen, wo über andere Dinge gesprochen wird als über die, die ich (ohnehin schon) mochte und die mir nah und vertraut waren. Das hat sowohl den Horizont als auch den Blick auf die vertrauten Gegenstände erweitert.

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Als Lehrender an einer Fachhochschule (UAS) ist die Forschungstätigkeit für mich bisher tendenziell im Hintergrund gewesen  -  leider. Ich habe neben meinen Lehraufgaben (in den Fachgebieten Allgemeine Betriebswirtschaftslehre, Volkswirtschaftslehre) aber immer eine Reihe von Projekten (anwendungsorientierte Auftragsforschung, Drittmittel-Projekte im Bereich hochschulbezogener Qualitäts- und Organisationsentwicklung) durchgeführt resp. leite derzeit noch ein Projekt zur Vorbereitung der Systemakkreditierung an meiner Hochschule (HS Flensburg).

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Bisher kann ich sehr zufrieden auf alle Veranstaltungsthemen im Bereich der BWL zurückschauen. Die Rückmeldungen seitens der Studierenden während des Veranstaltungsverlaufes sind so anregend, dass ich bislang alle geplanten Themen behandeln und bei Interesse um Spezifisches anreichern konnte. Wünschen würde ich mir weniger knappe Zeit, um die in der KSM-Gruppe erkennbare Neugier auf volkswirtschaftliche Bezüge der verschiedenen BWL-Themen noch mehr behandeln zu können.

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Mich haben Lehrbücher (alte wie auch aktuelle) zu den Themenbereichen Neue Politische Ökonomie zum einen und Regional- und Entwicklungspolitik immer sehr interessiert. Offengestanden komme ich leider viel zu wenig dazu, mir noch mehr Fachliteratur insbesondere zum Thema "Transformation" mit Blick auf Gemeinwohlökonomie -Klimaschutz - Gesellschaftlicher Umbau anzueignen. Empfehlen kann ich Karl R. Popper und John c. Eccles "Das Ich und sein Gehirn". Das Buch habe ich während meiner Studienzeit (1982) verschlungen. Gerne würde ich es mir jetzt mit knapp 40 Lebensjahren mehr auf den Schultern und im Kopf nochmal in Ruhe durchlesen.

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

halb voll !

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Die eigenen Zielsysteme und Prioritätensetzungen immer wieder konstruktiv-kritisch betrachten, Neugier auf andere Themen entwickeln und Grenzen testen, Kommunizieren und Netzwerken, wertschätzenden Umgang mit der Umwelt i. w. S. pflegen !

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Als ich wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Bauhaus-Universität Weimar (BUW) war, gab es einen deutsch-französischen Doppelstudiengang Europäische Medienkultur (EMK) bzw. licence information-communication (info-comm) zwischen der Fakultät Medien der BUW und der Université Lyon 2, für den ich sehr gerne den deutsch-französischen Lektürekurs gab, später Seminare, auf Deutsch und auf Französisch. Mich hat es gereizt, die poststrukturalistischen Klassiker auf Französisch zu lesen, mit den deutschen und französischen Studierenden über Medien, Filme, Artefakte zu reden, später dann auch intellektuelles Neuland zu betreten, das zu lesen, was in der info-comm unterrichtet wurde. Dass Medienwissenshaft von einem Land zum anderen so anders sein kann, ganz andere Theoriereferenzen, andere Annahmen und Argumentationsweisen, das hat mich sehr gefordert und seitdem hat mich dieses Thema nicht mehr losgelassen. Ich war dann auch mehrmals zu Lehraufenthalten in Lyon gewesen, sah, wie andere in Europa über Europa und den Nexus von Europa und Medien denken. 

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

WS 2016/17: MyFacebook, MyYoutube: Medien im Selfie-Modus? (auch nochmals FrSe 2019) und im HeSe 2017: Das Internet der Dinge

In Zukunft: um die Thematik des (kulturpessimistischen, z.t, dystopischen) Anwurfs des ‚Technologischen Totalitarismus‘ (Frank Schirrmacher), der Herrschaft der Algokratie

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Die Filme, die mich als Studentin am meisten beeinflusst haben, waren die von Pier Paolo Pasolini: Accattone, La Ricotta, Mamma Roma und Il vangelo secondo Matteo, später die von Guy Maddin Archangel, Tales from the Glimi Hospital und vor allen Dingen Theo Angelopoulos Der Blick des Odysseus, Die Ewigkeit und ein Tag und auch die von Chantal Akerman.

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Es ist mehr als halb voll !

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Mehr Systematik! Immer Exzerpieren, niemals lesen, ohne darüber nicht wenigstens ein paar Zeilen zu schreiben, dann sinnvoll und wiederauffindbar abspeichern, professionell das 10-Finger-Schreiben erlernen, im Studium mindestens ein Jahr in einem englischsprachigen Land studieren, auch wenn die erste Fremdsprache eine andere ist (die beiden letzten Punkte bringen auf die Lebenszeit gesehen eine ungeheure Zeitersparnis!)


How did you decide on your field of study?

When I started my BA, I was a bit undecided about my field of study: I had intended to do a music degree, but I received a Faculty of Arts National Scholarship, so I chose to stay in the Humanities. Luckily, at my university (University of Western Ontario), you could do something called a "Scholars' Electives Degree," meaning that you could design your own degree and take any course in any faculty regardless of prerequisites. I had the privilege of doing an Honours BA in English and Comparative Literature, but I also dabbled in Music, French, Classical Studies, Women's Studies, Philosophy, etc. In my final year, I took a course on James Joyce's Ulysses with Prof Michael Groden, and suddenly all of my previous reading coalesced; even my music background  became relevant. I immediately knew I wanted do a PhD on Joyce and I haven't looked back.


What was your best KSM seminar topic to date, and what would be a desirable topic for a future KSM seminar?

I've only taught one KSM Seminar so far on Victorian narrative tactics, which I guess makes it my best to date!  Seriously though, we did have a lot of fun reading about the unique insanity that is the Victorian period. I would love to teach a Ulysses class in KSM and put together a Bloomsday when we're back to being in-person! 


What book has particularly influenced you, or is a must read?

I think it would be a toss up between Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Stella Gibbons' Cold Comfort Farm. The more I read, the more this changes, but these two would be my perennials. Putting Ulysses here would be too obvious.  ;)


Is the glass half full or half empty?

Half full when it comes to others; half empty for myself. Luckily, refills are always close by.  Also, is it a cute glass/mug?  This is important.


Looking back from your own experience, what advice would you give to your former student self?

When I was doing my MA, one of my professors told our class that the MA degree is a really special time: you get to read so much for the first time and everything is new and exciting. You're not a BA anymore, but you don't yet have the pressures of pursuing an academic career. You have a unique perspective that you can only have at that point in your studies and you can ask questions without any embarrassment. He said that it would be the most creative and invigorating time of our lives and we wouldn't even know it. Looking back, I agree and disagree: you never stop reading and it's still possible to be invigorated by your work. Also, teaching is the best second hand exposure. It's always easy to look back and think about how "leisurely" it was "back then" but it certainly didn't feel that way at the time. So, instead, I would maybe tell first year BA-Michelle to take German instead of (in addition to?)  Latin. 

Wie sind Sie zu Ihrem Forschungsschwerpunkt gekommen?

Ich habe mehrere Forschungsschwerpukte:

Global Art: Dazu bin ich anlässlich der Ausstellung "The Global Contemporary. Kunstwelten nach 1989" vor einigen Jahren im Zentrum für Kunst und Medien Karlsruhe (ZKM) gekommen. Zusammen mit einer Kollegin hatten wir eine Begleitveranstaltung vor Ort realisieren können, somit habe ich zahlreiche intensive Einblicke in wichtige Diskurse und künstlerische Sichtweisen bekommen und seitdem interessiere mich sehr für Global Art Kontexte.

Medienkunst: Dazu bin ich vor Jahrzehnten im Laufe meiner beiden Studienrichtungen (Medienwissenschaft in Bochum und Kunstpädagogik in Essen) gekommen. Durch eigene Videokunstarbeiten nahm ich an Festivals teil, wo ich wiederum von der Fülle an Medienkunst-Formen und -themen fasziniert war (z.B. Ars Electronica Linz, Europäisches Medienkunstfestival Osnabrück, ZKM Karlsruhe). Hinzu kam später die wissenschaftliche Beschäftigung mit Medienkunst, die zu meiner Doktorarbeit (New York und Tokyo in der Medienkunst. Urbane Inszenierungen zwischen Musealisierung und Meditisierung) führte.

Jugendkulturen/FanArt: In meiner 12jährigen Beschäftigung als Mitarbeiterin an der Goethe Universität Frankfurt im Bereich Neue Medien hatten wir Forschungsprojekte, vor allem zu Jugendkulturen (der Fokus meiner Chefin damaligen Chefin Prof. Dr. Birgit Richard). Ich konnte an Forschungs- und Ausstellungsprojekten mitwirken und bin durch ein Forschungsprojekt zu Heldinnenfiguren in Games u.a. auf die vielfältige FanArt Szene gestoßen, die ich hinsichtlich unterschiedlicher Aspekte im Bereich von Kunst & Medien & Fandom untersucht habe und weiterhin spannend finde.

Welches war Ihr bestes KSM-Seminarthema bisher, und was wäre ein Wunschthema für die Zukunft?

Das beste Seminar fand ich mein allererstes 2011 zu jugendkulturellen Inszenierungsformen: Da wurde nicht nur sehr engagiert und unter großen Meinungsverschiedenheiten diskutiert, sondern zudem verschränkten sich fachliche Reflexionen mit sehr gelungenen und durchaus aufwändigen Gestaltungen der Studierenden (Fotoserien, Videos, Ausstellungen zu Jugendszenen) – die damalige Modulprüfung von KSM1 bot dafür ausreichend Gestaltungsspielraum.

Ich habe kein generelles Wunschthema: Mitunter gruppieren sich Seminare recht spontan rund um aktuelle Ausstellungen mit zentralen Kunstthemen (wie z.B. "Schönheit" oder "Manifeste"). Ein anderes Mal gibt es ein Oberthema (wie Global Art), in der das Interessante u.a. darin liegt, wo Studierende eigenständig ihre favorisierten Orientierungen einbringen und ungewohnte Perspektiven entwickeln. Und wieder ein anderes Mal geht es weniger um ein Thema als um einen Kunstbereich (wie Medienkunst), zu dem man sich entlang der großen Kategorien von Raum und Zeit nach Wunsch in Inszenierungsparameter vertiefen kann.

Welches Buch hat Sie besonders beeinflusst, bzw. sollte man unbedingt gelesen haben?

Asterix hat mich auf jeden Fall sehr geprägt, insbesondere die frühen Jahrgänge! Am lang anhaltendsten ist mein Interesse am siebenbändigen Lexikon "Ästhetische Grundbegriffe" von Karlheinz Barck mit zahllosen anspruchsvollen und dabei inspirierenden Artikeln zu zentralen ästhetischen Begrifflichkeiten von A-Z (in der ZHB vorhanden!) Und vom Konzept her mag ich sehr die infocomics-Reihe, wo gute Erklärungen mit Humor kombiniert sind, z.B. "Kapitalismus. Ein Sachcomic" (https://www.tibiapress.de/kategorie/infocomics/)

Ist das Glas halb voll oder halb leer?

Übergelaufen!

Welchen Rat würden Sie, rückblickend aus eigener Erfahrung, Ihrem Studierenden-Ich geben?

Rausfinden, was der persönliche Luxus am Studium ist – und den ausgiebig zelebrieren…